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Maine Lobster Shrimp
Maine Lobster Tails Scallops
Mussels Alaskan King Crab
Little Necks & other hard-shell clams Fresh Fish
  Steak
Steamer Clams Good Food Handling Tip
Oysters How to eat Maine lobster?

Click here to Learn more about Maine Lobster with our Lobster 101 Guide.


Maine Lobster

Hauled from the pristine waters off Maine's rocky coast, live Maine lobsters are a New England tradition that has become favorites of epicures around the world. Whether you're having a summer cookout or a black-tie affair, fresh seafood delivered overnight can turn any event into a special occasion, not soon to be forgotten. Indulge yourself in succulent, fresh live Maine lobsters, delivered directly from the ocean to your home. From one and a quarter pounds to six pounds, our live Maine lobsters are fresh and full of flavor. Just order before 12:00 PM (EST) and we guarantee fresh seafood delivered overnight. Fresh seafood delivered overnight makes a memorable gift for almost any occasion.

Perfectly cooked lobster is surely one of life simplest pleasures. Live Maine Lobsters are a snap to cook. Steaming and boiling are the two most common ways to cook lobsters. Steaming cooks whole lobsters more slowly than boiling, so it reduces the chance of overcooking. It also makes less of a mess! Never overcook your lobster this makes the meat tough and stringy. For cooking a bunch of lobsters, boiling gives you even fast cooking. In the winter, lobsters have a harder shell and therefore require more time to cook. In the summer, the lobsters have a softer shell and require less time.
 

New England Steamed Lobster

1.

Pour about 2 inches water in the bottom of a pot large enough to comfortably hold the lobsters. Add 2 tablespoons of salt for each quart of water. (Feel free to use a steaming rack to place the lobsters on or just add directly to the pot.) Bring water to a rolling boil over high heat. Place lobsters in the pot (head first), cover tightly, return to a boil as quickly as possible and start counting the time.

2.

Steam a lobster for 13 minutes per pound, for the first pound. Add 3 minutes per pound for each additional pound thereafter. For example, a 2-pound lobster should steam for 16 minutes and a 1 ½-pound lobster should steam for 14½ minutes.

3.

Regulate the heat if the froth starts to bubble over.

4.

Lobsters are done when the outer shell is bright red, when the meat is white, or when the 2 front antennae pull out easily. Do not overcook.

5.

Carefully remove lobsters from the pot with tongs. Be careful, they are very hot. Set in a large bowl for five minutes to cool before cracking.

 
New England Boiled Lobster

1.

Bring a large pot filled with water deep enough to submerge the lobster by about 3 inches to a strong boil.

2.

Place lobsters head first into the pot, completely submerging them.

3.

Cover the pot tightly and return to a boil as quickly as possible. When water boils, begin counting the time. Regulate the heat to prevent water from boiling over, but be sure to keep the liquid boiling throughout the cooking time.

4.

Boil lobster for 10 minutes per pound, for the first pound. Add 3 minutes per pound for each additional pound thereafter. For example, a 2-pound lobster should boil for l3 minutes and a 1 ½-pound lobster should boil for 1l ½ minutes.

5.

Lobsters are done when the outer shell is bright red, when the meat is white, or when the two front antennae pull out easily. Do not overcook.

 
Carefully remove lobsters from the pot with tongs. Be careful, they are very hot. Set in a large bowl for five minutes to cool before cracking.

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Cooked Lobster Tails

Preparing & Handling

Our lobster tails are cooked fresh & shipped fresh, not frozen. Tails are best enjoyed the day your receive them.

Lobster tales can be kept, refrigerated for up to 2 more days or frozen for up to a month.

Tails can be cut in half lengthwise, left whole, or sliced into medallions. Note: It takes about 5 pounds of live lobster to make 1 pound of meat.


Cooking

Serve chilled or use for superb lobster rolls, salads or your dish of choice. Serve warm, simply sauté or warm up in oven or grill. Do not overcook. The meat will become tough.


Frozen Lobster Tails

Thaw the tails overnight in the refrigerator, if time permits, or soak them in a bowl of cold water to a boil and drop in the tails. Begin timing once the water returns to a boil and cook 6 to 7 minutes for 5-to 6-ounce tails and about 8 minutes for 8 ounce tails.

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Mussels


Preparing & Handling

Plan to cook fresh (live) mussels soon after they arrive.

Store mussels in a mesh bag if possible. This will help keep the shells closed.

Healthy mussels will gape slightly, but if you tap two together they should close quickly

Discard any broken or open mussels, or will not close when tapped together.

Do not suffocate mussels by sealing them in a plastic bag or airtight container. Never keep mussels in a bowl with melting ice. NEVER eat a mussel whose shell is unopened AFTER cooking.


Serving Suggestions

Generally ½ to 3/4 lb per person is served as an appetizer, and 1 ½ pounds would be a main course for 1 person.


Cooking:
Steam

Just before cooking mussels in the shell, they should be scrubbed under cold water.

Place one to two inches of water, wine or a combination of these, and steam over high heat about five to seven minutes until shells open widely.

For extra flavor add a dash of wine, garlic/and or butter.

Discard any that do not open

Squeeze lemon juice over mussels and serve with melted butter for dipping.

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Little Necks & other hard-shell clams


Preparing & Handling

Keep live clams cold in the refrigerator, covered with wet kitchen towels or paper towels until you are ready to cook and serve them..
o Shucked clams should be kept in tightly covered containers, immersed in their liquor; they, too, should keep for up to a week.

You can freeze shucked raw clams in their liquor in airtight containers. Most types of frozen raw or cooked clams will keep for two months if the freezer is set at 0°F or colder. Be sure to thaw frozen clams in the refrigerator, not at room temperature.
Serving Suggestion:
Serve ½ dozen clams on the half shell per person.

Do not put clams in an airtight container or submerge them in fresh water, or they will die. Never expose clams to sudden temperature changes.


Cooking

Little necks are the best served raw on the half shell. They are also delicious steamed (see steamer clams), used in chowder, or sautéed with sauces or in a favorite pasta dish. 

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Steamers


Preparing & Handling

Because the shells are soft, you are bound to find a small number of clams broken. Shells may open or gape naturally: this does not necessarily mean the product is spoiled or dead. The siphon or neck, of a soft-shell clam will constrict when touched. A gentle tap on the shell will usually cause the clam to close. If a clam does not respond to a tap on its shell, or if the shell is broken, it should be discarded.

Plan to cook your steamers soon after they arrive.

To store clams in the shell, refrigerate (34-45 F) in a shallow bowl and cover with a clean damp cloth.


Serving Suggestions:

Allow 1 pound of steamers per person as an appetizer or 2 pounds per person as a main course.
DO NOT suffocate clams by sealing them in a plastic bag or air-tight container. DO NOT put them directly on ice or let them sit in water.


Since steamers are raked from sand and mud flats, you will find some sand. A brine soak helps clams rid themselves of sand and grit before they're cooked. Soak clams in a solution of 1/3 cup of salt in 1 gallon of water (just to cover) for about an hour in the refrigerator. Some cooks suggest adding a tablespoon of cornmeal to the salt mixture.

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Oysters


Preparing & Handling

Store oysters at 33-40 degrees damp cold. Oysters can be kept in a bowl draped with a damp towel, but they should be arranged carefully so they lie flat; otherwise their briny liquid may drain out. Stored properly they should remain alive for 5 to 7 days, but freshness deteriorates with each day

Oysters still in the shell are best eaten soon after they arrive.

An oyster that doesn't close when you press on its shell is dead and must be discarded.

Shucked oysters and their juices should be wrapped airtight and can be stored under refrigeration for 4 to 5 days or frozen for up to 2 months.

Do not store oysters where they could freeze, or where temperatures will fluctuate widely or reach over 40 F.

Do not store oysters submerged in melted ice water or other standing water. Do not store oysters in a sealed plastic bag or other airtight container.

 

If you a serving oysters or clams on the shell raw, they are easier to open if you place them in the freezer for about 5-10 minutes before opening them.

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Shrimp

Peel & Devein Shrimp:

Using your thumbs, split open the thin shell along the concave side, between the two rows of legs. Peel the shell away. Using a small knife, make a shallow slit along the back to expose the dark, veinlike intestinal tract. With a knife tip or your fingers, lift up the vein and discard.


Boil

Wash the fresh shrimp and peel & devein under running cold water.

Salt the water lightly. You can also add some lemon juice, if desired.
Immerse in enough boiling water to cover the shrimp.

Begin to calculate the cooking times as soon as water boils again.

Reduce the heat.

Simmer 3-5 minutes until shrimp turn pink and firm. Do not overcook, as it is extremely easy to do so.

Drain immediately and cool rapidly in cool water or a bowl of ice to prevent further cooking.


Grill

Start grill; the fire should be quite hot.

Peel Colossal White shrimp under running cold water. Make a shallow cut lengthwise down back of each shrimp; remove the black vein with the tip of a knife.

Brush the shrimp with a bit of olive oil; sprinkle them with salt and pepper. (You may also use your favorite marinade or barbecue sauce.)

Run a skewer though the larger head section of the shrimp and repeat with another skewer through the smaller tail section. (Soak wooden or bamboo skewers in water at least 20 minutes before grilling to keep them from burning up on the grill.)

Spray grate with cooking spray and place skewers over high heat for three to four minutes on each side, until shrimp are pink and firm. Be careful not to overcook.


Bake

Peel Colossal White shrimp under running cold water. Make a shallow cut lengthwise down back of each shrimp; remove the black vein with the tip of a knife

Preheat over to 350. Butterfly the shrimp (cut a deep slit down the back so shrimp will lay flat.) Place in a baking dish making sure they do not overlap.

Sprinkle with bread crumbs and cook about 20 minutes until opaque through and through

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Scallops


Preparing & Handling

Plan to cook fresh-shucked scallops soon after they arrive.

Keep shucked scallops in their own sealed container. They can be refrigerated for up to 2 days.

Sea Scallops freeze better than most seafood. Simply place scallops in a plastic container and top with milk before freezing.

Though they may be large, sea scallops still cook quickly, so keep a close eye on them. Recipes often suggest cutting them in half across the grain before cooking, but the large size makes sea scallops a natural for the grill.

Remove the little tab-like (tough) muscle on the side of the scallop before cooking. Rinse scallops under cold running water to remove any sand or grit and pat dry using a paper towel.
Serving Suggestions: 1 lb. would be an appetizer serving four or as a main course for two.

Don't microwave scallops - they can explode at higher settings.


Sauté

Heat 2 Tbs. olive oil in a heavy nonstick skillet over medium high heat.

Add scallops, and salt and pepper to taste. Sauté 3-4 minutes or until scallops turn milky white or opaque and firm.


Broil

Turn on broiler. Brush scallops with olive oil. Sprinkle with lemon pepper and garlic powder.
Broil about 5 minutes until scallops are opaque. Serve with lemon wedges.

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Alaskan King Crab Legs

Preparing & Handling

Our Alaskan King Crab legs are all fully cooked and then flash frozen

Properly wrapped Alaska King Crab can be stored in the home freezer at 0 degrees F or lower up to 4 months. For optimum quality, thawed crab or crab meat can be stored in the refrigerator 1 to 2 days.


Cooking:

Be careful not to overcook your king crab as it will reduce the king crab's prized texture and taste.


Chilled:

Place frozen crab legs in a shallow pan or on a tray. Cover with plastic wrap or foil and thaw, refrigerated, 8 to 10 hours or overnight. Simply cut up and eat chilled with fresh lemon and lime wedges.


Steam:

Place steam basket in large pot; fill pot with boiling water to depth of ¾ inch.

Place Alaska King crab legs in basket; reduce heat and steam, covered, about 5 minutes or until crab is thoroughly heated. Serve with plenty of melted butter and lemon.


Broil:

Place Alaska King crab split legs in broiler pan, shell-side down; brush with butter or favorite sauce.

Place pan about 4 inches from heat; broil 3 to 4 minutes. Brush occasionally with butter or sauce while broiling.


Microwave:

You can thaw and heat Alaskan King Crab legs in the microwave in one step. Wrap legs in a damp paper towel and microwave for about four minutes (time will vary depending on the number of legs you have.


Barbeque:

Place Alaska King crab legs, shell-side down if legs are split, on rack about 5 inches above hot coals.

Barbeque about 5 minutes or until thoroughly heated; brush occasionally with butter or sauce



A crab/lobster shell cracker or just a good ol' nutcracker will come in handy. All you have to do is crack it, pull away the shell and eat it. You can also use a good pair of good scissors if you like to get the meat out in big pieces. Hold the crab in one hand and cut lengthwise on one or both sides of the leg.

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Fresh Fish

Fresh fish should not have a fishy smell, but should smell like the ocean.
How Much Fish to Buy

Whole or round fish--3/4 to 1 lb. per person

Dressed or clean fish--1/2 to 3/4 lb. per person

Fillets and steaks--1/3 to 1/2 lb. per person


Preparing & Handling

Unless thoroughly iced, don't leave seafood, raw or cooked, out of the refrigerator.

Store fresh fish cuts no longer than 24 hours. The fish should be unwrapped, rinsed and patted dry, and rewrapped loosely in butcher or waxed paper and stored in the fridge.

If you are freezing fish, place it in plastic or other airtight wrap. Store for no more than one month. Thaw frozen fish in the refrigerator unwrapped, placed on several layers of paper towels, and loosely covered. Never thaw seafood on the counter at room temperature.

Do not marinade seafood in a citrus-based marinade for more than 30 minutes, or it will begin to "cook".

Never put cooked seafood on the same platter used before it was cooked.

Keep raw seafood separate from cooked seafood to avoid cross contamination.



Freezing a good piece of fish at home and cooking it two weeks later is preferable to keeping it refrigerated for 5-6 days before cooking it.

Cooking
Fat content is an important consideration when selecting fish for a particular cooking method. Lean fish are best cooked by moist methods such as steaming, poaching and baking. Oily fish baste themselves and are ideal for grilling and pan-frying.

The 10 Minute Rule
Measure the thickness of fish at its thickest point & cook for 10 minutes per inch of thickness.. This rule applies to baking in a 450 oven, frying, broiling, steaming and grilling. Cook a one inch thick fish steak 5 minutes per side. Add five minutes to cooking time for fish cooked in foil or sauce. Fish is done when the flesh is opaque and begins to flake easily.

 

Baking: Cook at a high temperature-450 degrees. Estimate time following the time minute rule. Preheat the oven for best results.

Broiling: Adjust the oven rack to about 5-6 inches for thick filets; and 2-3 inches for thin filets. Preheat the broiler. Lightly oil the pan. Place marinated or lightly oiled fish in a single layer.

Deep Frying-Maintain oil at 375. Drain fish on a wire cake rack and set in rimmed backing sheets

Pan-frying, Sautéing or Searing. Use medium heat. Use a non-stick skillet or spray oil. You can also use a cast iron skillet with light butter or oil. Make sure fish is dry by patting it dry with a paper towel or applying a light dusting of flour

Grilling: When grilling fish steaks, always leave the skin attached to seal in flavor. You can remove when serving.

 

One of the most important things you can do is clean and oil your grill rack. (To clean a grill, turn the heat up high, close the lid. In ten minutes, turn off the grill and scrape the grid clean). Prior to starting the grill, coat the grill rack with vegetable oil. Use a paper towel or spray grill rack with cooking spray.

Grill fish on medium-high heat. Light charcoal grill 30 minutes in advance or start charcoal grill 10 minutes before cooking.

If using a marinade, allow fish to soak up flavor for at least 30 minutes. Always marinade fish in the refrigerator.

Brush or pat both sides of the fish lightly with olive oil. Set fish on grill for 2-3 minutes to firm,

Lift fish, flip and finish cooking 3-6 minutes more depending on the fish and its thickness. Avoid overcooking and turning more than once. (Flipping back and forth will break fish apart.) Always bring cooked fish from the grill inside on a clean plate, not the same one that carried the raw fish.

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Steak

Preparing & Handling

Steaks are flash frozen and vacuum-sealed in plastic wrap.

Store fillets in the refrigerator meat compartment or in the coldest part of the refrigerator.

Our vacuum-packed steaks can be refrigerated up to five days or kept in the freezer for up to 6 months

Thaw steaks in the refrigerator with the wrapper on. Do not defrost meat in the microwave oven, as they will dry out. For quicker results thaw in a pan of cold water.

Let a steak warm up to room temperature. While you wait, season the steak lightly with olive oil, salt and black pepper or your favorite steak rub. As the steak warms up, it begins to "breathe" a little, allowing it to absorb the tenderizing seasonings.


Cooking

Aim to turn your steaks over only once.

Avoid using forks, which puncture a steak's natural flavor seal. Tongs, handled gently, do the best job.

Remember, it is better to undercook, because you can always put steaks back on the grill!

It's a good idea to remove the steak from the broiler or grill slightly before desired doneness as it will continue to cook for a short time after you remove it.

Let your steaks stand for at least five minutes. This allows the meats natural juices to settle.

Refrigerate leftovers promptly after serving

 
Preheated Oven Broiler
2 to 3 inches from heat source
Thichness Doneness FirstSide AfterTurning
3/4 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
5 min.
7 min.
10min.
4 min.
5 min.
8 min.
1 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
6 min.
8 min.
11min.
6 min.
8 min.
9 min.
1 1/4 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
7 min.
8 min.
12 min.
5 min.
7 min.
10 min.
1 1/2 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
7 min.
9 min.
13 min.
6 min.
7 min.
11 min.
1 3/4 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
8 min.
9 min.
14 min.
7 min.
8 min.
12 min.
 
Grill - Charcoal or Gas (to be used as a guide)

If you use a non-gas grill, make sure the briquettes have reached a chalky gray color that indicates proper heat before placing the steak on the grill. In order to preserve a uniform level of heat, don't raise the grill lid until your ready to turn or remove the steaks.
 

Thichness Doneness FirstSide AfterTurning
3/4 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
4 min.
5 min.
7min.
2 min.
3 min.
5 min.
1 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
5 min.
6 min.
8 min.
3 min.
4 min.
6 min.
1 1/4 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
5 min.
7 min.
9 min.
4 min.
5 min.
7 min.
1 1/2 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
6 min.
7 min.
10 min.
4 min.
6 min.
8 min.
1 3/4 Inch Rare
Medium
Well
7 min.
8 min.
11 min.
5 min.
7 min.
9 min.

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Good Food Handling Tips

Always wash hands thoroughly with hot soapy water before and after handling raw seafood and meat.

Before cooking, rinse seafood and meat under cold water.

Always marinade seafood and meat in the refrigerator. Discard used marinade

Keep raw and cooked seafood and meat separate and use separate utensils, platters and cutting boards.

Wash knives, cutting surfaces, sponges, and hands that contact raw food.

Always refrigerate leftovers immediately.

If you are in doubt about your food, throw it out!


Although we often eat our shellfish raw, the FDA requires all shellfish dealers to provide consumers with the following warning: "Thoroughly cooking foods of animal origin such as beef, eggs, fish, lamb, poultry, or shellfish reduces risk of food borne illness. Individuals with certain health conditions may be at higher risk if these foods are consumed raw or undercooked. Consult your physician or public health official for further information."

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